The Price of Freedom

As we head into the month of July, we pause again to remember those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.  While in California last week, my wife and I had the privilege of meeting Ann Carmel, a Bahamian cousin who shares with me several key family names including Saunders, Lowe, Moore and Lightbourn.  During our discussion of mutual Lightbourn family connections, we stopped and reflected on Warren Lightbourn.  Ann provided the photograph below of several Bahamian lads, including cousin Warren,  headed off to World War II.

Warren Lightbourne and friends
Lads going to WWII. Front L-R: Hartis Thompson and Philip Farrington. Back: L-R Garth Johnson, George Moseley, and Warren Lightbourn. Source: Bahamas Handbook.

Fellow cousin and noted Bahamian author and photographer, Ronald G. Lightbourn, shared with Ann the following comments on the photograph in an earlier post about Warren.

Warren kneeling on the wing of his Spitfire is quite something. He was so handsome. The conch shell painted on the fuselage represented an enemy fighter shot down. I believe that eventually there were many; but eventually, nearly at War’s end in February, the tables turned on him. The story of George Moseley is equally tragic.

Unfortunately, George Moseley and Warren Lightbourn did not return from the war.  Their sacrifice is honored in Caribbean Aircrew in the RAF during WW2.  

Aircrew  Flt Lt  Warren Maurice,  LIGHTBOURN
Service No: 119573  Service: RAFVR
Trade/Branch:   Pilot Squadron(s): 610 Sqn
Station/Unit/Ship: B.78 Eindhoven
Group: 127 Wing     Command:   2TAF
Nationality: Bahamas  /  Disposal:   KIA  /  Age  25  years  /  Date Died:    14 Feb 1945
Aircraft 1: Spitfire XIV

Note:  See also the following link.

 

George Winthrop Sargent, MOSELEY – F/L
Service No: 114927  Service: RAF Pilot, 305 (Polish) Sq
Nationality: Bahamas / Disposal:  KIA / Age 25 yrs / Date Died: 26 Nov 1944

56036879_137339040339

 

 

2 thoughts on “The Price of Freedom

  1. Ann, Thanks for pointing me to the following article first published in The Tribune November 11, 2004 that pays tribute to two of the lads in the photo.

    http://www.nassauinstitute.org/articles/article489.php?view=print

    Excerpt…
    According to Paul Aranha, who became a Bahamas Airways pilot in 1963, “Of those who returned, Thompson is the first name that springs to mind. Hartis Thompson became director of civil aviation and his brother, Leonard, enjoyed a long and distinguished career in aviation, both as a pilot and as manager of Bahamas Airways.”

    Another top wartime pilot was Philip Farrington, who died last year: “Philip was my boss and a legend in his own time. He was a leading light with Bahamas Airways, right up to the day the company was liquidated,” Aranha said.

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